skinScan Blog

skinScan is a mobile application that enables users to remotely screen and monitor their moles/lesions using advanced automated algorithms as well as provides access to an expert doctor’s opinion on the case in less than 24 hours.


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Reblogged from erin-nations

Tanning beds are no healthier than sitting in the sun.

Tanning beds are no healthier than sitting in the sun.

3 things to know when buying sunscreen

3 things to know when buying sunscreen

Reblogged from abcworldnews
abcworldnews:

Are you out in the sun this summer? Beware: The Surgeon General issues an urgent skin cancer warning #SGSunSafe

abcworldnews:

Are you out in the sun this summer? Beware: The Surgeon General issues an urgent skin cancer warning #SGSunSafe

Reblogged from thenewrepublic
Melanoma has other plans…

Melanoma has other plans…

A healthy tan is an oxymoron: any tan is a sign of damage to your skin!

A healthy tan is an oxymoron: any tan is a sign of damage to your skin!

Study finds #sunscreen use in your teens important for avoiding #skincancer! Use it!

Study finds #sunscreen use in your teens important for avoiding #skincancer! Use it!

Slip. Slop. Slap. Wrap. Wear a hat with at least a 2- to 3-inch brim all around.

Slip. Slop. Slap. Wrap. Wear a hat with at least a 2- to 3-inch brim all around.

July is UV safety awareness month

July is UV safety awareness month

Reblogged from thedrozshow

thedrozshow:

Skin cancer is treatable if caught early. Use this chart provided by the American Academy of Dermatology to perform a self-exam and track your moles. Learn more about preventing melanoma here.

Reblogged from medicalschool
medicalschool:

Melanoma
Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanocytes are cells that produce the dark pigment, melanin, which is responsible for the color of skin. They predominantly occur in skin, but are also found in other parts of the body, including the bowel and the eye (see uveal melanoma). Melanoma can originate in any part of the body that contains melanocytes. Melanoma is less common than other skin cancers, however, it is much more dangerous if it is not found early. It causes the majority (75%) of deaths related to skin cancer. Worldwide, doctors diagnose about 160,000 new cases of melanoma yearly.
Unusual moles that may indicate melanoma:  Characteristics of unusual moles that may indicate melanomas or other skin cancers follow the A-B-C-D-E guide developed by the American Academy of Dermatology:
A is for asymmetrical shape. Look for moles with irregular shapes, such as two very different-looking halves.
B is for irregular border. Look for moles with irregular, notched or scalloped borders — characteristics of melanomas.
C is for changes in color. Look for growths that have many colors or an uneven distribution of color.
D is for diameter. Look for new growth in amole larger than about 1/4 inch (6 millimeters).
E is for evolving. Look for changes over time, such as a mole that grows in size or that changes color or shape. Moles may also evolve to develop new signs and symptoms, such as new itchiness or bleeding.


Everything about melanoma

medicalschool:

Melanoma

Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanocytes are cells that produce the dark pigment, melanin, which is responsible for the color of skin. They predominantly occur in skin, but are also found in other parts of the body, including the bowel and the eye (see uveal melanoma). Melanoma can originate in any part of the body that contains melanocytes. Melanoma is less common than other skin cancers, however, it is much more dangerous if it is not found early. It causes the majority (75%) of deaths related to skin cancer. Worldwide, doctors diagnose about 160,000 new cases of melanoma yearly.

Unusual moles that may indicate melanoma:
Characteristics of unusual moles that may indicate melanomas or other skin cancers follow the A-B-C-D-E guide developed by the American Academy of Dermatology:

  • A is for asymmetrical shape. Look for moles with irregular shapes, such as two very different-looking halves.
  • B is for irregular border. Look for moles with irregular, notched or scalloped borders — characteristics of melanomas.
  • C is for changes in color. Look for growths that have many colors or an uneven distribution of color.
  • D is for diameter. Look for new growth in amole larger than about 1/4 inch (6 millimeters).
  • E is for evolving. Look for changes over time, such as a mole that grows in size or that changes color or shape. Moles may also evolve to develop new signs and symptoms, such as new itchiness or bleeding.

Everything about melanoma

Are you willing to risk melanoma?

Are you willing to risk melanoma?

Slip. Slop. Slap. Wrap. Use sunscreen and lip balm with broad spectrum protection and and SPF of 30 or higher.

Slip. Slop. Slap. Wrap. Use sunscreen and lip balm with broad spectrum protection and and SPF of 30 or higher.